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Kia to Recall Nearly 87,000 Vehicles in Wake of Fire Risk


Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Kia Motors is recalling over 80,000 vehicles after a defect in the cooling fan resistor was found, creating the risk of potential fires.According to documents from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the recall affects as many as 86,880 Kia Fortes from the 2014 model year. Vehicle owners are expected to be notified next month.Dealers will replace the cooling fan resistor and the multifuse unit in all recalled cars. Owners of vehicles with a 1.8 liter engine will also have software updated.Follow @ABCNewsRadio!function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src="http://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Behold a Material So Water Repellent That Liquid Just Bounces Off


BananaStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Behold, a material so water-repellent that liquid drops just bounce off the surface.Two scientists at the University of Rochester, Chunlei Guo and Anatoliy Vorobyev, have created a metal surface that is so hydrophobic that it makes Teflon look like superglue by comparison.The findings were published Tuesday in the Journal of Applied Physics and the related YouTube video has logged more than 965,000 views as of Sunday."Super-hydrophobic materials are desirable for a number of applications such as rust prevention, anti-icing, or even in sanitation uses," the researchers said in their description of the video.Check out the astonishing video below.Follow @ABCNewsRadio !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src="http://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Apple iPhone 6 and 6 Plus Sales Soar on Samsung's Home Turf


ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Apple has gained significant market share in Samsung's home country of South Korea due to the company's successful bet on making bigger iPhones. Following the release of its 4.7-inch iPhone 6 and 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus, new data shows that Apple has taken a big bite out of the market shares of its closest smartphone competitors in South Korea -- Samsung and LG. Apple was responsible for 33 percent of smartphone sales in the country in November, according to data released by Counterpoint Research. "No foreign brand has gone beyond the 20 percent market share mark in the history of Korea's smartphone industry," said Tom Kang, Counterpoint's research director in South Korea. "But iPhone 6 and 6 Plus have made a difference here, denting the competition's phablet sales." Apple also gained a bigger slice of the market in Japan, according to Counterpoint, soaring to 51 percent of the market share in November. Shares of Apple stock opened at $112.32 on Friday, up more than 40 percent in the past year. The company will report earnings for its first fiscal quarter on Jan. 27.Follow @ABCNewsRadio !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src="http://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

How to Make the Most of Falling Mortgage Rates


Creatas/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage is close to 3.6 percent, a near rock-bottom low that’s more than a full percentage point lower than this time last year.And for many, refinancing could mean huge savings.In the words of Shark Tank’s Barbara Corcoran: ”Money’s on sale.”If a home buyer has a typical $200,000 30-year fixed rate mortgage at 4.6 percent and they refinance at 3.6 percent, they stand to save $118 a month — more than $40,000 over the life of that loan.Too many homeowners across the U.S., however, are paying more than they need to — 20 percent are still paying rates of more than 8 percent, according to the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau.“Anyone who has equity in their home — and a rate higher than today’s current rate — should take a look,” said Erin Lantz, a mortgage expert at real estate website Zillow.Lantz said it was about all about shopping around — something that 47 percent of home buyers never do, according to the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau.First-time home buyers Scott and Maya Kohn of Brooklyn, New York, said they had no idea where to start so Lantz shared the following tips to help them save as they look for their new home:1. Don’t jump at the first offer.“I always encourage people to look at at least three lenders and talk to them and let them know that you’re talking to other lenders,” Lantz said.2. Negotiate until you get the best possible deal.“So the difference between a 3.5 percent rate and a 4.5 percent rate on your purchase price could be savings of $500 a month,” Lantz said.Experts do caution homeowners though to look at the fees and if they plan to move in two years or less, refinancing likely does not make sense because the costs would outweigh the savings. Follow @ABCNewsRadio !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src="http://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Early Warnings About IRS Scams This Tax Season


eric1513/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The government issued a warning Thursday for Americans to be on high alert for tax-season scams that feature fake IRS agents.Lois Dilibero said a fake IRS agent left a voicemail on her phone recently.“They said, ‘You need to call us right away. You’re being sued for $5,000 by the IRS,’” Dilibero told ABC affiliate WPLG-TV in Miami. “I thought, ‘Yeah, really?’ … I knew I didn’t owe any money to anybody.”In Dilibero’s case, she said she knew immediately that it was a scam.Tim Camus, a top investigator with the U.S. Treasury Department, said even he got a call demanding that he pay $750 or get arrested.Nearly 3,000 people have already fallen victim, scammed out of more than $14 million, officials said.And half of that money has come from these five states: California, New York, New Jersey, Florida and Pennsylvania.The scammers, often overseas, disguise their phone numbers to make people think they’re calling from the IRS and then make serious threats of jail time and even deportation.The IRS says it would never call demanding immediate payment and would never make a person pay with prepaid cash cards or ask for credit card information.The agency said it also would not threaten to arrest you.Follow @ABCNewsRadio !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src="http://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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